Fresh Faced Deck

By: Danny Lipford

Fresh Faced Decks

While a deck is the prime place for outdoor entertaining, chances are the weather has taken its toll on the wood surface. Whether your deck is just plain old or has recently been installed, find out how to get your deck ready for entertaining and protect it well beyond the barbecue season.

Tools and Materials:

You will need the following:

  • pump-up garden sprayer
  • garden hose
  • pressure washer
  • hammer
  • nails
  • pry bar
  • deck cleaning solution
  • sealant/stain
  • paint brush, roller or paint sprayer

Clearing and Minor Repairs

Clearing and Minor Repairs

Completely clear the deck of furniture and accessories and sweep away any large debris. Inspect for damage and use an appropriate stain remover to lift any grill or dirt stains. Protruding nail heads should be tapped back in place so that you are not setting yourself or someone else up for an injury.

Examine the deck for any rotten wood; this is especially important for decks that sit in the shade. Be sure to check under decking boards and on the underside of stair treads for wood rot which tends to occur in places that are hard to see. Areas of wood with extensive rotting, cracking or warping should be replaced. These will have to be measured and cut to the appropriate length.

Clean The Surface

Cleaning The Surface

Once you’ve got the minor repairs under your belt, you’ll need to clean the surface of the deck. Generally a cleaning solution will help get rid of tough dirt and grime and improve your decks ability to soak up a new stain or sealer. Before applying any cleaning solutions read the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations.

For some solutions, it may be necessary to first wet the deck and surrounding areas before application. Several deck washes contain bleach and other ingredients that may be harmful to plants so it’s a good idea to cover them with a plastic drop cloth. Some deck cleaners can clean and restore natural beauty to gray, weathered wood without bleach, so it’s safe for use around plants and shrubs.

Cleaning deck steps with pressure washer.

Fill your pump-up garden sprayer with the deck wash and apply the solution first to the rails and benches. If you do not have a pump-up garden sprayer a mop or even a watering can will do the job. You can also apply the cleaner by hand with a stiff bristled brush, just be sure to wear rubber gloves.

Once the cleaner has set for the appropriate amount of time, rinse it off with a pressure washer. A pressure washer will speed up the process and give improved results if used correctly. Too much pressure used to close to the wood will often splinter the wood. Too little pressure and you might as well use your water hose. After cleaning the deck let it dry for at least 48 hours.

Stains and Sealants

Stains and Sealants

When at last your deck looks new again you’ll need to protect it from future water and sun damage. Stains and sealants are almost as abundant as smoking grills on the fourth of July. Just remember when choosing a sealant to make sure that it contains a water-repellant, a UV blocker, and maybe even an insecticide to keep wood-eating bugs from harming your deck.

Clear sealants will allow the natural color of your deck to shine through while semi-transparent sealants and stains allow you to add a hint of color to your deck, while still permitting the natural grain of the wood to show through. Read the product labels carefully for information about how the sealant will perform. Each will give recommendations on how often you’ll need to reseal or restain.

Stains and sealants can be applied by using a brush, paint roller, or sprayer. Spraying is by far the fastest method. Work the entire length of a deck board until you reach a logical break such as a door frame. Follow the sprayer with a brush and back brush to avoid puddles. Keep a wet edge to decrease the chance of lapping. Usually two coats of stain or sealer are recommended.

Wood Deck Alternatives

If you’re tired of the routine maintenance required of a wood deck, consider replacing your deck boards with a composite decking, which is made from a mixture of wood and plastic. Composite decking never needs to be sanded, stained, or sealed and is guarded against UV weathering, insect damage, rotting, and warping.

Although initially more expensive than the wood, composite decking offers large savings over time due to reduced maintenance costs.

Regardless of the direction you decide to take your deck improvements taking care of initial deck maintenance and repairs now will give you more time to relax, sip some iced tea and enjoy your outdoor living area before the fireworks begin.

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7 Comments on “Fresh Faced Deck”

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  • Terry Fuller Says:
    November 25th, 2007 at 8:27 pm

    Look the Show. You make sense of the projects on the show and give get advise.
    Thank You,
    Terry Fuller



  • Brian Corban Says:
    October 3rd, 2007 at 5:43 pm

    I recently had a company called Sealmaxx come out to my house and give me an estimate on cleaning and sealing my wood deck. It was considerably more expensive than conventional staining, but they assured me that this sealant would penetrate and seal my wood from the inside out. They guarantee no more deterioation for 25 years. The salesman was quite informative and helpful in answering my questions, but I would still like another professional opinion about this type of process. I would like any constructive comments that people would like to share.

    Thank You,
    Brian Corban



  • Mary R. Says:
    September 2nd, 2007 at 11:07 am

    On the weather channel 2 +/- weeks ago, you talked about a deck stain/sealer that you applied, then brushed “into the wood”. I have not found that product in this website so far. Can you let me know what it is as I would like to use it on my deck. The weather is getting cooler for me to work outside now.
    Thanks so much,
    Mary Rodgers


  • Official Comment:


    Ben Says:
    August 1st, 2007 at 1:40 pm

    Marcy,
    A deck takes a lot of abuse from the elements, and while there are special paints available for porches and decks, they can peel and crack after a few years. Both water and oil based products are available, though if you use oil based, be sure the deck is thoroughly dry since trapped moisture tends to pop the finish off. This is especially true for newly installed pressure treated wood since it often comes saturated with the chemical used to treat it. If you decide to use paint, you can make the surface less slippery by adding a small amount of clean dry sand or an additive made for that purpose. This is especially important on steps which can become a real hazard when wet.



  • Marcy K Says:
    July 29th, 2007 at 3:50 pm

    Instead of a stain for the deck can I paint it? I am also going to do my shutters and lattics the same color



  • Terri Z Says:
    May 8th, 2007 at 11:41 am

    Thank you. I found the information on this page very helpful, and I look forward to having a better looking deck this year!



  • Leo Brown Says:
    April 8th, 2007 at 1:34 pm

    This was very helpful. I am planning on cleaning my deck, and putting on a stain.
    Thanks for your help.


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