Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

Growing Edible Chrysanthemums

By:

Yellow chrysanthemum flowers

I planning to grow edible chrysanthemums in my herb garden. Can any type of mum be used, or should I grow specific varieties? -Vivian

All chrysanthemum flowers are edible, but the flavor varies widely from plant to plant, from sweet to tangy to bitter or peppery. It may take some experimentation to find flavors you like.

Here’s a handy guide to using edible chrysanthemums in your kitchen:

  • Chrysanthemum Tea: Traditional Asian chrysanthemum tea is typically made from the yellow or white flowers of Chrysanthemum morifolium or Chrysanthemum indicum. You can buy traditional Chrysanthemum morifolium plants for your garden at Companion Plants.
  • Chrysanthemum Greens: If you’d like to experiment with cooking chrysanthemum greens, try growing Garland chrysanthemum, or Chrysanthemum coronarium. This traditional Japanese vegetable, also known as Shungiku, has a mild flavor that lends itself well to stir-fries and chop suey. Since you can use both the flowers and the greens of Garland chrysanthemum, it’s the most popular “edible” chrysanthemum for home gardens. You may be able to find Garland chrysanthemum at your local garden center, or you can buy seeds from EGardenSeed.com.
  • Salads, Garnishes, and Stir-Fries: Any type of chrysanthemum flowers can be blanched, then the petals removed and added to your favorite dish. This is easiest with large petaled varieties of mums. Use only the petals, since the flower base is usually very bitter.
  • Chrysanthemum Wine: You can also make wine from chrysanthemum flowers. Again, traditionally yellow or white blossoms are used.
  • Cautions: Pyrethrum, a plant based insecticide, is made from the dried flowers of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium or Chrysanthemum coccineum. Although it takes a pretty high concentration of flowers to make pyrethrum, I would still avoid planting these types of mums in an edible garden.

Julie

Further Information



Please Leave a Comment

One Comment on “Growing Edible Chrysanthemums”

You can follow comments to this article by subscribing to the RSS news feed with your favorite feed reader.

  1. angela lavender Says:
    September 13th, 2014 at 2:17 pm

    i would like to know if the starburst white chrysantheme is edible.

We want to hear from you! In addition to posting comments on articles and videos, you can also send your comments and questions to us on our contact page or at (800) 946-4420. While we can't answer them all, we may use your question on our Today's Homeowner radio or TV show, or online at todayshomeowner.com.

Click to check out all our great giveaways!