Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

How to Make Hummingbird Nectar and Refill a Feeder Fast

By:

Hummingbird feeders have to be cleaned and refilled regularly, since the sugar solution ferments quickly outdoors. Some bird experts recommend going to extra lengths – such as boiling the solution – to make it last longer. But I find that during a hot summer, the stuff goes bad (or gets buggy) in 3-4 days no matter what.

Instead of spending time trying to make the perfect nectar, I set out to develop a system that gets fresh nectar to my birds in five minutes flat. And I don’t mean those tricks on TV, where it only takes five minutes if you’ve laid out and pre-measured everything beforehand. I mean FIVE MINUTES, from start to finish. And yes, I timed it! With this system, you can refresh the nectar as often as needed.

Got your stopwatch ready? It’s as simple as:

Read More: Next Page >>



Please Leave a Comment

5 Comments on “How to Make Hummingbird Nectar and Refill a Feeder Fast”

You can follow comments to this article by subscribing to the RSS news feed with your favorite feed reader.

  1. Sheri L. Williamson Says:
    March 24th, 2010 at 1:54 pm

    Good instructions *except* about using hot tap water. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend against using hot tap water for drinking or cooking because it can contain much higher concentrations of lead from pipes and fixtures:

    http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/tips/water.htm

    Hummingbirds can drink 2 to 5 times their weight in sugar water in a day, so the risks from lead-contaminated water are much greater for them than for us.

    Water from a lead-free instant hot water dispenser should be okay, but a minute to a minute and a half in the microwave is usually enough to get the sugar dissolve, even starting with ice-cold water, and would still keep your prep time at 5 minutes or less.

    It’s also not necessary to make the solution extra strong to attract the birds in the first place. They won’t know what’s in the feeder until they take the first sip anyway, and a solution that’s too strong may not provide them with adequate water during hot, dry weather. If you keep the solution on the weak side, the birds will need to visit more often to get the same number of calories, and the feeder will be less attractive to bees.

  2. Official Comment:

    Julie Day Says:
    March 24th, 2010 at 8:00 pm

    Thanks for your insights, Sheri. Good point on the lead in the water! You’re right, a minute in the microwave would dissolve the sugar and not add much time. I’m not a real fan of microwaves, but it’s just as easy to put the teakettle on while you’re measuring the sugar.

    People sometimes use a stronger solution during the early migration season, hoping to make a good impression on a traveling male – perhaps entice him to stick around. But in my yard, the hummingbirds don’t need any special favors (in fact, they’re downright greedy and demanding!) so I just use the 1:4 ratio all season long. If you do start out stronger, make sure to reduce the concentration by late spring. The lower 1:4 concentration is closer to the natural sugar content of plant nectar, and it’s always better to follow nature’s lead.

  3. Waltman Says:
    July 30th, 2010 at 2:37 pm

    My home has no lead in its lines or fixtures. I also have a glass-lined heater. Hot water from the tap is perfectly safe on a reasonably new house.

  4. Linda Finale, Sunnyvale,CA Says:
    January 15th, 2011 at 2:28 pm

    Thanks all, I’m a new comer to this kinda stuff. I love the fact that I can help the birds everyday. I am a property manager and I live there. There are many beautiful flowers and trees. The flowers don’t grow year round, so I wanted to help the birds. Thanks again to all, Best to everyone. LF

  5. Sallie Krebs Says:
    April 30th, 2012 at 7:07 am

    We keep a Britta water filter container in the fridge. I use water from that to make up a quart of nectar, which is enough to partially fill my 6 feeders. I also warm part of the water first in the microwave.

We want to hear from you! In addition to posting comments on articles and videos, you can also send your comments and questions to us on our contact page or at (800) 946-4420. While we can't answer them all, we may use your question on our Today's Homeowner radio or TV show, or online at todayshomeowner.com.