Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

Allen Lyles Blog

How to Paint Aluminum Siding

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One common question that Danny and I receive on the radio show is, “Can I paint aluminum siding; and, if so, what is the best method?” Great question.

The key to painting aluminum siding is preparation and priming. All of the chalkiness must be washed and scrubbed off, and any flaking paint removed. In a nutshell, you need to start with a clean palette.

Once everything is clean and dry, you’re ready to apply your primer. Here’s where a lot of people make a mistake and, unfortunately, I’ve even heard of “professional” painters who do this. They apply a latex primer.

This is probably the worst thing you can do when painting aluminum siding. Most latex paint has ammonia in it, and that includes primer. Ammonia has a chemical reaction to aluminum, which produces a tiny amount of gas.

Latex paint, by nature, is very elastic, so you end up with an elastic coating with gas bubbles underneath it. If you don’t quite see the problem here just think about how your own insides react a couple of hours after eating two or three bean burritos . . . ’nuff said, right? The gas build-up under the latex primer pushes up and out, which bubbles and flakes the top coat, in other words, it causes the paint to fail.

The solution is to use an oil-based primer specifically designed for metal surfaces. You will have to wait longer for an oil primer to dry, but it’s better than having to re-do everything within a year or two.

Once the primer is dry, top coat with a 100% acrylic paint. If you take this approach to your aluminum siding paint project, you’ll have a long-lasting finish you can be proud of.



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21 Comments on “How to Paint Aluminum Siding”

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  1. Mario Vespucci Says:
    November 27th, 2009 at 3:26 am

    This should clear up why aluminum sidings need a long time to prime. Thanks. =)

  2. robert mcdonough Says:
    May 11th, 2010 at 1:39 pm

    I have heard several reliable professional sources recommend the use of a latex paint after using the oil-based primer. Why shouldn’t we use an oil-base exterior paint over the oil-based primer for the best finish and bond? I know the clean-up is harder but the result is tighter and longer-lasting isn’t it?
    Thanks.
    Robert

  3. Official Comment:

    Allen Says:
    May 12th, 2010 at 7:42 am

    Great question, Robert! I’ll go back to the fact that a lot of “professionals” will also use latex as a primer, and that’s the biggest mistake in my book. But, beyond that, there’s a difference in latex and acrylic latex. Instead of a water base (latex), acrylic is a chemical base. But, the latex properties of the acrylic also mean it’s going to be more forgiving to expansion and contraction. That gives it an advantage over oil top coats. And, unlike oil in an exterior venue, it resists chalking and blistering much better. That doesn’t mean you can’t go to the extra effort of an oil top coat, but for my dime, I think an acrylic latex will provide a better appearance as long as you prep and prime the right way!

  4. Sheila Says:
    May 17th, 2010 at 8:25 am

    So, do you use an oil base acrylic for your top coat also? since we use an oil base primer.

  5. Julie Says:
    October 4th, 2010 at 12:08 pm

    Do you suggest flat or satin finish for the alumimum siding paint?

  6. Scott J Says:
    October 10th, 2010 at 1:16 pm

    What kind of roller is used to apply both the primer and paint?

  7. chris bartlett Says:
    January 21st, 2012 at 9:14 am

    hay danny, the alumimum on my home is from the 70s & two years ago i sanded all the paint off only to be called away on a job. the alumimum has sat uncovered all this time in middle baldwin co. im ready to paint now. please tell me what i should do to prep the alumimum after all this time? thank you for any help… chris

  8. Ron Johnson Says:
    July 24th, 2012 at 8:22 am

    Can I paint aluminum siding a darker color than the original color?

  9. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    July 31st, 2012 at 4:33 pm

    Hi Ron,
    Your question was answered in the second hour of our July 28 Homefront radio show. You can listen to the show on our website at http://www.todayshomeowner.com/homefront/2012/07/28/homefront-radio-show-for-july-28-2012/
    Thank you for your interest!

  10. Marian Says:
    October 22nd, 2012 at 12:23 pm

    Is it better to use a paint sprayer or roller? Is one better than the other?

  11. Larry Says:
    April 7th, 2013 at 1:43 pm

    Danny…
    I am not disagreeing with you regarding the use of an oil-based primer on weathered aluminum siding prior to painting. We have always washed the house to remove dirt, mold and chalk. We then blend a bonding coat of a top quality latex paint and EB…Emulsa Bond followed by a coat of straight paint once the first coat has dried. We have several houses that have not displayed any signs of paint failure even after 10-15 years. Any thoughts on this?

  12. nombulelo Says:
    June 12th, 2014 at 3:57 am

    hi! danny i will like to paint my aluminum windows the problem is i don’t now which shop must i get the paint.

  13. Larry of L-M Painting, Syracuse NY area Says:
    June 12th, 2014 at 8:31 am

    I agree with Larry’s post. We have always washed the siding, allowed to dry and then use a bonding coat of 100% Acrylic latex paint mixed with EB followed by a coat of pure paint. We too have several houses that have been done that way and other than a little fading of the original color one is going on 16 years with no signs of peeling or paint failure.

  14. Don Says:
    June 23rd, 2014 at 6:04 pm

    Probably a silly question but is the best way to apply with a roller or would a spray gun work?

  15. Marian Says:
    June 26th, 2014 at 10:13 am

    I believe this is exactly what happened to my aluminum sided home when I had it repainted last September. By December the paint was peeling off in several places. My question is will this peeling continue all over the house eventually? If so, can I request a refund from the painting company. Right now (June 25th)they are making piecemeal repairs. I believe they should have power washed the entire house to expose any flaking paint before making repairs. Do you agree?

  16. Larry of L-M Painting, Syracuse NY area Says:
    June 26th, 2014 at 1:37 pm

    Marian..
    I agree, the washing is an important part of the process. The peeling can very well continue but no one can say for sure. It’s all about the preparation and if the company that did the work did not prepare the siding correctly failure of the new material is likely. I would certainly ask them if they are willing to come back and make things right. Is there anything in the paperwork you received from them about a guarantee? That might be your only recourse at this point. Good luck!

  17. John M. Says:
    June 29th, 2014 at 11:13 am

    We just had our house painted to find the painters did only one of the paid for two coats. They did not use a primer that you recommend, just the top coat. They did pressure wash most of the house before painting. What prep work is needed to ensure the paint stays on the house before a second coat is applied? we do have a couple chips and signs of the original paint in some areas.

  18. mike Says:
    July 13th, 2014 at 8:40 pm

    We had our steel siding painted a couple months ago and I have noticed on the front of the house there are several good size bubbles under the paint. Any suggestions on what caused this and how I can fix it?

  19. Dave A. Says:
    August 7th, 2014 at 12:25 pm

    My home is covered with aluminum siding from the 70′s. Siding is very chalky but not one bit of peeling. What is the best cleaner to use for the prep washing, thank you.

  20. Larry of L-M Painting, Syracuse NY area Says:
    August 7th, 2014 at 7:39 pm

    A solution MEX or house wash (available at most paint and hardware stores) mixed with water. Apply as directed, agitiate with a soft scrub brush and rinse thoroughly, a powerwasher works best. If some minor chalking remains don’t worry, if you use a bonding primer (combination of Emulsa Bond and paint) that will insure adhestion of the finish coats. The finish should be a good quality 100% acrylic latex paint.

  21. Kevin Says:
    September 1st, 2014 at 12:48 pm

    I am getting ready to repaint metal siding, actually steel as it is magnetic. I cleaned the garage very well with TSP and water and bleach, most all chalk is removed, and there is NO blistering or anything, in fact just very faded smooth paint. Do I need to use an oil primer at all? Or could I just use a paint and primer all in one?

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