Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

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How to Remove and Replace a Toilet

By:
Newly installed toilet in bathroom.

Newly installed toilet in bathroom.

I want to put a new floor in my bathroom and need to know how to take the old toilet out and put a new one in? -Tommy

Hi Tommy,

Begin by turning off the water at the cut-off valve located behind the toilet. Flush the toilet, holding the handle down so all the water drains out of the tank, then use a sponge to remove any remaining water from the tank and bowl. Next, use a wrench to disconnect the water supply line from the bottom of the tank.

Take the plastic covers off the flange bolts in the floor on each side of the bowl, unscrew the nuts and remove the washers. Work the toilet loose from the wax gasket that seals it to the drain flange and lift it out. After cleaning the old wax off the drain flange, put a rag in the drain or tape over the flange to keep sewer gases out while you’re working on the new floor.

When you’re ready to install the new toilet, turn the bowl on its side and press a new wax ring around the opening on the bottom of the bowl. If the flange bolts are corroded, slide them out of the slots and replace them. After removing the rag or tape from the drain, position the bowl on the drain opening, and press down firmly, rotating the toilet slightly from side to side to seat it on the flange.

Next, install the washers and nuts on the flange bolts and tighten them up, applying even pressure to each side until the bowl is firmly seated on the flange opening and floor. Be careful not to crack the bowl by over tightening the nuts. If necessary, cut the bolts off with a hacksaw so the plastic covers can fit over them.

Attach the tank to the bowl, using the bolts and rubber gasket supplied with it, followed by the supply line in the bottom of the tank. Open the cut-off valve, fill the tank, and flush the toilet while checking for leaks.

You can find more about removing and replacing a toilet—including a cool tip on how to drain water out of the bowl—in our Bathroom Makeover episode. For information on other toilet repairs, see our article on Repairing a Toilet.

Danny



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10 Comments on “How to Remove and Replace a Toilet”

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  1. gregory holowka Says:
    September 26th, 2008 at 9:54 am

    Can Dietra be used as a Thermal-Break when installing a tile floor

  2. Misty Pierce Says:
    February 5th, 2009 at 1:24 pm

    I am removeing a standard toliet and replaceing it with a handicap, is the process the same as standard for standard?
    thank you
    misty

  3. Toronto plumbing Says:
    March 24th, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    Great article !! I must add that a video would be very appreciated to show us how to proceed. Thanks

  4. Ronnie Poole Says:
    January 26th, 2011 at 4:36 am

    My apt toilet is small, outdated, and cannot handle my, shall we say “wide girth.” I am also disabled and have the ok to put a bigger, higher, better- six million dollar toilet in to replace old one. As a DIYer I am good to do it myself. I got a perfect toilet from a HYATT REGENCY HOTEL renovation, almost exact measurements as disabled unit. My question is/are… Is there more than one size of toilet wax ring? If so what is the common size? and should I remove the bowl off of the seat before I set it? and is there normaly any amount of slide room in the toilet mount holes? thanx

  5. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    January 26th, 2011 at 8:33 am

    Hi Ronnie,
    As far as I know, there’s only one size of wax ring for a toilet, and one size fits all. There are different brands, with and without an embedded plastic flange in the wax seal. You’re probably going to smush the seal down to an unrecognizable shape when you put the toilet on it anyway, but the plastic built-in plastic flange seems to add a little extra insurance against leaks. Usually the bowl is installed then the tank and seat attached. Work the bowl back and forth until it’s about touching the floor to compress the wax ring, then tighten the toilet flange bolts to prevent the possibility of cracking the porcelain around the base of the toilet. The flange holes in the toilet bowl are oblong to give some wiggle room with the bolts. Good luck with your project!

  6. vandana Says:
    December 13th, 2011 at 2:19 am

    i have a wall mounted newly fixed wc however the base below the wc leaks 2 min after the flush my plumber has already changed the washer twice but the leak continues please help

  7. Maurice Says:
    April 1st, 2012 at 1:08 pm

    Hi I was watching one of the episodes of removing a toilet this morning on tv they were going ro replace the fooring they showed flushing the water out of the tank then with the remaining water in the bowl they had a packet of something that gelled the water up I was wondering what is was.
    Maurice

  8. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    April 1st, 2012 at 9:58 pm

    Hi Maurice,
    We post an article for each episode of our Today’s Homeowner TV show on the Today’s Homeowner section of our website at http://www.todayshomeowner.com/television/
    The show you are referred to is called “Flooring That Fits” and the episode article can be found at http://www.todayshomeowner.com/television/2011/11/20/flooring-that-fits/
    In it you will find information about the product that was used to remove water from the toilet.
    Thank you for your interest!

  9. michael baylor Says:
    August 18th, 2012 at 6:22 pm

    is there an episode on how to remove a toilet flange.

  10. michael baylor Says:
    September 2nd, 2012 at 6:17 pm

    I was inquiring about removing a toilet flange. I have to replace the floor and I am not sure how to seat the flange on the new floor. Thanks

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