First Time Homeowner 4: Bathroom Remodel

By: Danny Lipford
Danny Lipford First Time Homeowner bathroom after remodeling.

Danny Lipford First Time Homeowner bathroom after remodeling.

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Our 1940 First Time Homeowner house only has one small bathroom. Since it hadn’t been remodeled in years and was in need of a major update, we decided to give the room a serious makeover.

First Time Homeowner bathroom after demolition.

First Time Homeowner bathroom after demolition.

Bathroom Remodel

Our bathroom remodel included:

  • Demolition: Remove fixtures, walls, ceiling, and floor to gut the room down to the studs.
  • Window: Remove the existing window above the bathtub, and replace it with a smaller one from JELD-WEN Windows & Doors that won’t interfere with the shower surround.
  • Installing bathroom vent fan.

    Installing bathroom vent fan.

  • Doors: Replace the bathroom door and other interior doors in the house with JELD-WEN Craftsman III doors using the Perfect Fit digital template system, available through The Home Depot in select locations, for doors that precisely fit the existing frames.
  • Vent Fan: Install a NuTone Ultra Silent bathroom vent fan that’s properly sized to provide enough ventilation for the room.
  • Plumbing: Install plumbing for the tub, shower, toilet, and sink.
  • Wiring: Rough in wiring for the light, fan, and wall outlets.
  • Insulation: Insulate the interior and exterior walls of the bathroom.
  • Leveling bathtub.

    Leveling bathtub.

  • Bathtub: Install Ensemble tub and surround by Sterling.
  • Drywall: Install moisture and mold resistant purple drywall on the bathroom walls.
  • Vanity and Wall Cabinet: Install Merillat five-drawer bathroom vanity with soft action closing drawers from their Avenue Collection in maple with Chiffon finish and matching wall cabinet.
  • Vanity Top and Sink: Install DeNova Natural Quartz countertop and backsplash in Flaxen Fesco and Kohler porcelain undermount sink.
  • Tile Floor: Install 13”x 13” Ivory Piazza porcelain floor tiles from Shaw Floors to match the color of the countertop.
  • Faucets: Install Fairfax sink faucet and tub faucet in oil-rubbed bronze from Kohler.
  • Hanging vanity mirror.

    Hanging vanity mirror.

  • Toilet: Install Rialto one-piece toilet from Kohler.
  • Paint: Paint the bathroom walls and trim.
  • Door Hardware: Install Schlage interior door handles from their Andover Collection with an aged bronze finish on the bathroom and other interior doors.
  • Cabinet Hardware: Install knobs on the vanity and wall cabinet.
  • Accessories: Install towel rods and rings and toilet paper holder.
  • Mirror: Hang vanity mirror on wall.
First Time Homeowner bathroom after remodeling.

First Time Homeowner bathroom after remodeling.

Office Room Makeover

In addition, closets were added to the room Chelsea will use for her office, with Eggshell color Replacement Of Nature Anso nylon fiber carpet from Shaw Floors on the floor.

First Time Homeowner Website

Find out more at our First Time Homeowner website, including:

Other Tips from This Episode

Cleaning clothes washer water line intake filter with acid brush

Simple Solutions with Joe Truini:
Clean Clothes Washer Water Filters

To clean sand, sediment, and other debris from the hot and cold water line intake filters on a clothes washer, turn off the water to the clothes washer, remove the water hoses, fill a spray bottle with water, and squirt the filters to wash away any dirt. Use a stiff acid brush to remove any additional debris in the filter.

Pergo XP Laminate Flooring

Best New Products with Jodi Marks:
Pergo XP Laminate Flooring

Pergo XP (Extreme Performance) laminate flooring comes with a limited lifetime warranty for residential installation and PermaMax protection for added resistance to stains and scratching. It comes in different widths and colors with realistic wood grain patterns and can be installed over concrete, tile, vinyl or wood floors. Pergo XP Laminate Flooring is available at The Home Depot.

Installing a bathroom vent fan

Ask Danny Lipford:
Sizing a Bathroom Vent Fan

To properly size a vent fan for your bathroom, find the cubic feet in the room by multiplying the room’s height by width by length. Divide the cubic feet by 60 (minutes in an hour), then multiply by 8 (air exchanges per hour) to find the minimum cubic feet per minute (CFM) rating for your vent fan. See How to Size a Bathroom Vent Fan to find our more.



Please Leave a Comment

3 Comments on “First Time Homeowner 4: Bathroom Remodel”

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  • carolyn Says:
    July 28th, 2014 at 6:21 pm

    Can another very light application of grout be done. Grout has already collected dust; that is what we need to cover/reapply.
    Thank You!

  • Pamela Chambers Says:
    March 10th, 2012 at 7:31 pm

    I saw the bathroom episode and saw the discussion regarding the vent in the bathroom. I have a problem with mine. I had my bathroom redone, but the contractor did not tear the ceiling out, but did replace the old vent with a new one.
    My problem is I believe the vent is improperly vented to the proper exit from the house. The house had a family room added to the rear of the house (prior to purchase), which bumps up against the bathroom, which use to have a window to the rear of the house, but it is now closed off and the bathroom is in the center of the house with only the vent for ventilation.

    I believe that the vent is still vented to the old exterior wall, which causes the paint on the wall in the family room to bubble up and looks like water damage. I have had this wall fixed at least 3 times in 15 years. The walls are also plaster and tere are not many master plasterers left.

    How can I remedy this? The bathroom is below the upstairs, so I can’t see how it is vented to the ceiling. Can you help me? Please email me back.

  • Kevin Riley Says:
    March 10th, 2012 at 9:00 am

    How much to do the bathroom

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