How-To Videos

Interior Painting Preparation

By: Danny Lipford

How to Paint a Room

This is the first in a three-part series on interior painting in your home:

Painting is one of the most popular do-it-yourself projects for homeowners. While we all want to see how the color we picked will look on the walls, it’s important to remember that the key to a good paint job starts long before you open the first can of paint. If the room isn’t prepared properly, the results may be less than you had hoped for and could lead to problems that are hard to repair.

Start by removing the furniture from the room and covering the floor with a drop cloth. Next, clean any dust and cobwebs from the walls with a broom then wipe down the trim with a damp cloth. A degreasing cleaner may be needed in the kitchen and other areas if the surfaces feel greasy to the touch.

Sand any rough spots and peeling paint. A flexible sanding sponge works great on moldings and other curved surfaces. Fill nail holes and dents with lightweight spackling, and caulk any cracks. After the spackling and caulk have dried, you are finally ready to start painting.

Use a brush to paint around the windows, doors, corners, baseboard, and ceiling before painting the walls.

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3 Comments on “Interior Painting Preparation”

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  • Kelly Caudill Says:
    February 26th, 2008 at 2:29 pm

    Women’s Day Remodeling and Makeover Mag. Page 78 (bathroom) What color was used on the walls? It’s the sweet retreat.
    Just love the color. Would like to use it in my master bathroom.
    Thanks, Kelly Caudill


  • Official Comment:


    Ben Erickson Says:
    November 7th, 2007 at 11:57 am

    Terry,
    Thanks for your comments. We plan to do an article on the website on installing fiber cement siding and will be sure to include shears.
    We are covering more and more “green” building ideas, so perhaps we can do a piece on practical solar and wind power applications in the future as well. Let us know how your solar panel system works out.



  • Terry Mosier Says:
    October 25th, 2007 at 1:50 pm

    I just watched your clip on the Weather channel on fiber cement board as siding replacement. I noted that you recommenced using abrasive blades to cut it if you had to do a lot of cutting. I wondered why you did not mention using a shear tool designed for that purpose. As a contractor I would not attempt to install a project with out one. They really work great and can be bought for $200 to $300 new. Reconditioned ones are also available.

    I have seen some of your clips on generators for whole house and partial home as backups. These are great ideas, but how about some information on going green. Like solar panels and if a country setting a wind generator. These can be whole house or partial home set up systems. A person can start out with a small system and add to it in stages to eventually become grid free if one wishes. I am not a green activist, but I dislike paying the power company the high rates that most are charging now. My plans are to start installing solar and build it up to grid free (my current consumption is 2875 kwh) for my home. This would allow me to retire with out an electric bill.

    Now if we could only do that with the TV and phones.


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