Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

640-ss-how-repair-damaged-drywall-corners

How to Repair Damaged Drywall Corners


Outside corners on walls take a lot of abuse and can become dented and damaged over time. Watch this video to see how to repair damaged drywall corners. ...More




    First Page
   page  1 of  49    

How to Repair Damaged Drywall Corners

By:

Outside corners on walls take a lot of abuse and can become dented and damaged over time. To repair damaged drywall corners:

  1. Use a hacksaw to cut through the damaged section of the metal corner bead.
  2. Score along the edge of the bead about 1¼” back from the corner.
  3. Pry the corner bead off the wall.
  4. Cut a new piece of drywall corner to fit.
  5. Nail the corner bead in place.
  6. Apply several coats of joint compound to the repair, allowing adequate drying time between each coat.
  7. Sand the joint compound smooth.
  8. Prime and paint the repaired section of wall.

For more on working with wallboard, see our article on How to Cut and Hang Drywall.



Please Leave a Comment

4 Comments on “How to Repair Damaged Drywall Corners”

You can follow comments to this article by subscribing to the RSS news feed with your favorite feed reader.

  1. John Cudnohufsky Says:
    February 26th, 2011 at 4:49 am

    how do you repair a cracked or split inside corner on drywall.

  2. Official Comment:

    Joe T. Says:
    February 26th, 2011 at 3:21 pm

    Hi John, Well, as you probably know, inside wall corners differ from outside corners in that they are covered with paper tape, not metal corner bead. When you say “cracked or split,” I assume you mean a vertical slit running about 1 1/2 inches from the inside corner. That’s caused when the paper tape pulls away from the drywall. It typically occurs in bathrooms and against outside walls, and is usually caused by excessive moisture or settling/movement in the wall framing.

    Regardless, the best remedy is to remove the entire piece of tape from floor to ceiling, and install a new piece. Here are the basic steps: Score the wall with a utility knife to the left the right of the wall corner, just beyond the tape seams. Use a putty knife to loosen the paper tape then peel it off. Brush the inside corner clean, then apply a thick bead of joint compound along the inside corner. Crease a length of paper tape down the middle lengthwise, then embed it into the compound. Smooth the tape with a 4-in.-wide drywall knife, then allow the compound to harden overnight.

    Sand the compound smooth, then apply another layer of joint compound, using a 6- or 8-in. knife. Again, let it dry, then sand. If necessary, apply a third and final joint compound coat, using a 10- or 12-in. knife, making sure you feather the edges.

    Now, with all that said, you can try spot repairing the cracked joint: Lift the loosened edge of the tape with a putty knife and squeeze in a little water-resistant carpenter’s glue. Hold down the repair with painter’s tape. Repeat wherever the tape is loose. This is much easier than replacing the tape, but it doesn’t always work as well. Anyway hope this helps. Thanks for writing and good luck!–Joe T.

  3. Paco Says:
    July 7th, 2013 at 1:41 pm

    Hello,

    I am extremely new to this and I have a section about 2 inches long on the metal that needs to be replaced due to it being bent on the outside corner, your video was great, but would you mind given me a very specific play by play, it is somewhat urgent I get the repair done soon. Thanks in advance!

  4. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    July 7th, 2013 at 7:26 pm

    Hi Paco,
    You can find written step-by-step instructions on how to replace a drywall corner bead under the video in the text at the bottom of the post.

We want to hear from you! In addition to posting comments on articles and videos, you can also send your comments and questions to us on our contact page or at (800) 946-4420. While we can't answer them all, we may use your question on our Today's Homeowner radio or TV show, or online at todayshomeowner.com.

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.