Battling Moisture and Mold

House with green siding and pecan tree in yard.

Susan and Tim Fitzhugh’s house.

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Homeowners Susan and Tim Fitzhugh have had moisture problems ever since they built their home 15 years ago, including leaks in the metal roof and problems with the shower leaking behind the bathroom wall, which had resulted in mold and mildew problems.

Repair Metal Roof Leak

The roof on the Fitzhugh’s house had been leaking for years where three slopes of the metal roof converge and drain onto a flat section of the roof.

Allen Lyle in attic with roof leak.

Allen Lyle in attic with roof leak.

The first step in fixing the roof leak was to remove the accumulated leaves and debris and trim the trees and shrubs away from the roof.

To find the leak, Allen went in the attic while Danny sprayed water on the roof from a garden hose. Communicating back and forth by cell phone made it easy to see where the water was getting in.

Once the roof was dry, the gap in the roof was filled with Titebond Metal Roof Sealant, which is specifically designed for metal roof applications.

Watch How to Find Roof Leaks and read The Search for Hidden Roof Leaks to find out more.

Bathroom Shower Leak

In an attempt to stop the shower in the master bathroom from leaking behind the wall, the original tile shower had been removed and replaced with a cultured marble shower surround. In spite of all their efforts, however, the shower continued to leak.

Replacing faucet trim ring.

Replacing faucet trim ring.

To find the problem, a piece of baseboard was removed and an inspection camera inserted in the wall while the shower was running.

The leak turned out to be around the shower faucet trim plate. To fix the leak, a new trim plate and gasket were installed to seal the faucet tightly to the wall.

To remove the mold that had accumulated in the bathroom, Wet & Forget Indoor Mold+Mildew Disinfectant Cleaner was sprayed on the surface and wiped off after 10 minutes.

Install Bathroom Vent Fan

Since there wasn’t a vent fan in the shower area of the Fitzhugh’s bathroom, we installed a Broan ULTRA GREEN™ Humidity Sensing bath vent fan (model ZB110HL) with built-in light in place of the recessed light fixture over the shower.

The fan included a humidity sensor that turns the fan on automatically when the humidity in the bathroom is high and off when it returns to normal levels. The fan was vented through an outside wall using 6” duct.

Allen Lyle venting the new bath fan through an outside wall.

Allen Lyle venting the new bath fan through an outside wall.


The vent fan in the bathroom water closet was never vented to the outside, and moisture in the attic had damaged the insulation. To fix the problem, we vented the water closet fan to the outside through the attic gable wall.

The damaged insulation was removed and replaced with Roxul stone wool insulation. Stone wool insulation repels water, won’t contribute to mold or fungal growth, and is highly fire resistant.

Check out our Bathroom Vent Fan CFM Calculator to see what size vent fan your bathroom needs, and watch How to Replace a Bath Vent Fan to find out more.

Other Tips from This Episode

Paint can with plastic bag under lid.

Simple Solutions with Joe Truini:
Paint Can Sealing Tips

To prevent paint from drying on the paint can lid, wipe any paint off the lid when you open it. To better seal the paint can and make it easier to open, put a plastic shopping bag over the top of the paint can before hammering on the lid. (Watch Video)

Husky Workhorse Sawhorse

Best New Products with Jodi Marks:
Husky Workhorse Sawhorse

The Husky three-in-one Workhorse sawhorse can support up to 1,000 pounds. It has built-in 2×4 cutting support brackets and a wide top to make it perfect as a mobile work table. Husky Workhorse sawhorses are available at The Home Depot. (Watch Video)

Bending an asphalt shingle.

Ask Danny Lipford:
Asphalt Roof Replacement Test

An asphalt shingle roof is both inexpensive and durable. To tell whether your asphalt roof needs to be replaced, slowly bend one of the shingles back. If the shingle is brittle and breaks, it’s probably time to replace the roof. (Watch Video)





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Battling Moisture and Mold