Outdoor Kitchen: Part 2

By: Danny Lipford
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Behind the scenes of filming this episode
outdoor kitchen

The completed outdoor kitchen features brick-veneered cabinets and a natural stone countertop.

In Outdoor Kitchen: Part 1, we formed and poured two slabs that more than doubled the size of Ashley and Autumn Zellner’s existing patio. In the second installment we wrap up their outdoor kitchen project.

Building Outdoor Kitchen Cabinets

The Zellner family roasts marshmallows.

The Zellner family roasts marshmallows on the new fire pit.

After building the frames from pressure-treated wood, we joined the two cabinet sections together to form an “L” shape along the wall of the house and the outside edge of the new slab.

Once we attached the frames to the wall and built a platform for the grill, we cut backer board to fit the frames and secured it with construction adhesive and screws to stiffen the whole structure.

We covered the cabinets in split brick to match the house and installed the cabinet doors. And, in the midst of all the chaos, the plumbers connected the sink and gas line for the grill.

Autumn chose a beautiful Brazilian slab of granite from The Natural Stone Institute that has a matte finish rather than a polished appearance. It was the perfect finishing touch for their outdoor kitchen.

Watch How to Build Cabinets for an Outdoor Kitchen for details on this project.

The back patio now has dining space in addition to the outdoor kitchen.

The back patio now has dining space in addition to the outdoor kitchen.

Installing Gutters and Downspouts

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New gutters and downspouts funnel the water away from the patio.

To protect Ashley and Autumn’s new outdoor living space from the runoff coming from the roof above, we added gutters and downspouts.

One of the most critical parts of installing gutters is creating fall, or slope, which will ensure that water always moves toward the downspouts. For ideal drainage there should be about 1 inch of fall for every 20 feet of travel.

These do-it-yourself gutters came in 10-foot sections, which were seamed together with a special bracket and sealant.

Watch How to Install Rain Gutters for step-by-step instructions.

Other Tips from This Episode

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Simple Solutions with Joe Truini:
Installing Roller Catches to Keep Cabinet Doors Closed

Cabinet doors that won’t close all the way is a common problem. Instead of replacing the self-closing hinges, install roller catches to keep the doors closed. Watch video.

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Best New Products with Jodi Marks:
Husky Pass-Through Socket Wrench Set

This pass-through socket wrench set from Husky can tackle jobs that standard socket sets can’t. It is available at The Home Depot. Watch video.

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Outdoor Kitchen: Part 2