Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

How to Hang Anything on Anything

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Walk down the hardware aisle of any home center, and you’ll find an overpowering array of wall anchors and picture hangers. While it’s easy enough to drive a nail or screw through drywall and into a stud, many homeowners have problems figuring out how to secure items to the wall between studs or in hard surfaces like brick or concrete.

Here’s what you need to know about using wall anchors and picture hangers in your home.

Wall Materials

The type of anchor you use is often determined by the wall material. Drywall or wood paneling require little to drill or nail into while delicate surfaces like plaster take more finesse and hard materials, like masonry and concrete, require more muscle.

Drywall

Drywall alone has little holding power. When attaching lightweight objects (20 pounds or less), standard picture hangers or wire hangers work fine and do little damage to the wall. For medium weight items (20-40 pounds) consider a spreading type ribbed plastic anchors or threaded anchors. Heavy objects (over 40 pounds) require a fastener that distributes the weight behind the wall, such as a toggle or molly bolt.

Plaster

While a plaster wall may resemble drywall, it’s a much harder surface prone to cracking. Always predrill holes in plaster and avoid using fasters that apply pressure to the sides of the hole. For lightweight objects (under 3-5 pounds) consider adhesive hangers which don’t require a hole at all.

Wood

Fasteners attached to solid wood and plywood have great holding power if the material is thick enough. For thinner walls, such as plywood paneling, use robust fasteners like toggle or molly bolts or plastic anchors that spread out behind the wall. While nails do well in wood, screws provide much greater holding power and are easier to remove, though they do leave a larger hole in the wall. When nailing or screwing into wood, always drill a pilot hole first to keep it from splitting.

Masonry and Concrete

Plastic anchors or special hardened masonry nails are your best bet for attaching to these hard materials. Use a special carbide tipped masonry drill bit to predrill a hole for the fastener (a hammer drill does the job much faster and easier). Drill a smaller pilot hole first, then switch to a larger size bit to finish the job. On brick walls it’s easier to drill into the mortar joint than the brick itself, though the brick has greater holding power if it doesn’t break.

Wall Anchors and Fasteners

The different types of wall anchors and picture hangers that are commonly available include:

  • Toggle Bolts: These robust fasteners come in a variety of lengths and bolt diameters depending on the amount of weight they are intended to support and the thicknesses of the wall they are used on. While able to support over 300 pounds in drywall in our tests, toggle bolts require an oversized hole in order to insert the spring loaded fastener. This prevents the bolt from fitting tightly in the hole and leaves a large hole when the fastener is removed.
  • Threaded Toggle: These self-drilling fasteners are an improvement over standard toggle bolts since the shaft of the fastener fits tightly in the hole. Threaded toggles are easy to install, though they can be a bit tricky to remove, and safely supported over 200 pounds in drywall in our tests. On the downside, they leave a nice sized hole in the wall (though not as large as standard toggle bolts), and are expensive. For increased holding power, and to aid in removal, install with the long arm of the toggle pointing up.
  • Molly Bolts: These often used fasteners are inserted in a hole drilled in the wall, or can be hammered directly into drywall without drilling. Molly bolts achieve their holding power by tightening up the bolt, which causes the casing to expand behind the wall. While supporting over 100 pounds in our tests, molly bolts have an annoying tendency to spin in drywall when being tightened and are impossible to remove once installed. Like toggles, they come in various lengths depending on the wall thickness.
  • Threaded Anchors: These new fasteners on the scene are mainly used for drywall, with their deep threads providing increased holding power. They’re available in either brass or nylon, with a picture hook or center screw include with them. Threaded anchors are screwed directly into drywall and supported up to 80 pounds in drywall in our tests. While they provide good holding power and are easy to install and remove, threaded anchors leave a large hole in the wall behind.
  • Plastic Anchors: While working well in dense materials—like masonry, concrete, brick, or concrete block—plastic anchors don’t provide as much holding power in softer surfaces like drywall as other types of wall anchors. If they are used on drywall, choose a ridged type of plastic anchor that flares out behind the wall. Once the anchor has been hammered into a hole drilled in the wall, a screw is inserted into the center that expands to press against the sides of the hole.
  • Picture Hangers: Standard metal picture hangers have been around for years. They feature an angled nail that fits in the hook to increase their holding power. Picture hangers are inexpensive and available in a wide range of sizes. They supported between 40-60 pounds in drywall in our tests. While they don’t hold as much weight as other fasteners, picture hangers are simple to install and easy to remove with little lasting damage to the wall.
  • Wire Hangers: Sold under brand names like Hercules Hook, and Monkey Hook, these lightweight fasteners consists of a curved steel wire that can be installed in seconds without tools. While some brands claim to hold as much as 150 pounds, they supported less than 50 pounds in drywall in our tests. Since most pictures weigh considerably less than that, wire hangers work well for light items. They are easy to remove and leave little damage but only work on hollow walls with no obstructions. The PowerHook is a more robust hanger that works on the same principle but can hold up to 120 pounds, though it leave a larger hole.
  • Adhesive Strips: Adhesive hangers and hooks, such as 3M Command Strips, can be used to attach lightweight items without making a hole in the wall at all. . Adhesive strips will adhere to most smooth surfaces but they aren’t suited for bricks and other porous materials. They are rated for items weighing less than 3-5 pounds.

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69 Comments on “How to Hang Anything on Anything”

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  1. Jeff Bundy Says:
    October 18th, 2009 at 11:21 am

    What kind of fasteners do you recommend for plaster walls?
    Thanks.

  2. N. Sellers Says:
    October 18th, 2009 at 6:18 pm

    What kind of fasteners do recommend for vinyl siding interior and exterior walls of a garage?

  3. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    October 19th, 2009 at 9:18 am

    N. Sellers,
    Since vinyl siding provides little or no support, you will be going through it to attach to the wall material behind the siding, so use fasteners appropriate for the sheathing or wall material under the siding. Also, since vinyl siding is hollow, attach to it only on the flat part of the siding below where the siding for each “board” protrudes. Vinyl siding expands and contracts with changes in temperature. Multiple attachments to the same piece of siding will restrict this movement which can cause the siding to warp or buckle.

  4. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    October 19th, 2009 at 9:26 am

    Hi Jeff,
    In addition to the adhesive strips for light objects mentioned in the plaster section above, you can use standard metal picture hangers in plaster when attaching to a stud (predrill the hole through the plaster). If you can’t attach to a stud, picture hangers will work for lighter objects and molly bolts (make sure they are the proper length for the thickness of the plaster) for heavy ones.

  5. - Says:
    August 7th, 2010 at 6:32 pm

    there are mollys for different thicknesses of the “wall” material. some are for very thin “walls” (eg hollow core doors). if the space behind is shallow, you begin tightening with the supplied screw, then remove screw and finish tightening with shorter screw of same thread.
    you can use needle nose pliers to mangle mollys until the outer “collar” breaks off (metal fatigue).
    avoid the stick-on type of hanger. they can be the most difficult to make disappear, because they adhere to large surface area (otoh, paint remover might work best. i haven’t tried). there used to be some that were wet-and-stick. i suspect they might suddenly loosen if the air became unusually humid.
    anyway, nice to see some numerical pounds ‘ratings’, but those numbers aren’t associated with specific sizes (eg, mollys commonly sold in three diameters)
    I wouldn’t expect those prefab-hook-on-nail “Picture Hangers” to have held relatively high pounds. (though they come in different sizes)

  6. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    August 9th, 2010 at 9:53 am

    Hi Dash,
    Thanks for the feedback. You can find a more detailed testing of wall anchors, including the size of the molly bolt tested, in our article on Testing Wall Anchors and Picture Hangers.

  7. catehi fitzwilliams Says:
    October 17th, 2010 at 12:23 am

    How would i hang lightweight beadboard panels over plastered walls without finding studs or building a frame usually used in attaching paneling to walls?
    I am trying to avoid taking down wallpaper.

  8. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    October 17th, 2010 at 9:31 am

    Hi Catehi,
    If the wallpaper is firmly attached to the walls, you could use construction adhesive to attach the paneling to it. You will probably need a few fasteners to hold it in place while it sets, or you could use thin strips of wood (3/8″ x 1″ wide or so) slightly longer than the distance between the paneling and the opposing wall to act as temporary braces while the adhesive sets. Position the strip against the opposing wall, then bow it and position it against the paneled wall. Good luck with your project!

  9. paul Says:
    November 25th, 2010 at 12:28 pm

    how to hang cabnits on a brick wall in a kitchen

  10. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    November 30th, 2010 at 9:08 am

    Hi Paul,
    To hang cabinets on a brick wall, you would need to drill into the brick or mortar joints (a hammer drill works best), then use plastic or lead wall anchors to attach the cabinets to the wall. Good luck with your project!

  11. Maggie Says:
    April 15th, 2011 at 12:53 pm

    We have a framed painting that weighs about 5 lbs that we are trying to hang on wood paneling. The stud is too far away to use for where we’d like the picture to hang. We are a bit leery of the adhesive hangers since they may leave a mark if we decide to switch decor in the future, or living in WI, that the humidity during summer may loosen them and drop the frame. What can you suggest?

  12. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    April 15th, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    Hi Maggie,
    Assuming your wood paneling is more substantial than 1/4″ plywood paneling, a simple picture hanger or nail will hold quite a bit of weight. If it is thin sheet paneling, a sheet metal screw will probably work. If you really need a lot of holding power, a molly bolt would be your best bet, but it will leave a big hole in the wall. You can read all about how much weight wall anchors can hold in drywall, which would hold much less weight than wood paneling, in our article on Testing Wall Anchors and Picture Hangers, and find out how to hang a picture at How to Hang Pictures Right the First Time. Good luck with your project!

  13. brunnhilde Says:
    May 8th, 2011 at 1:17 pm

    I have tried quite a few things to hang a heavy bicycle holder to what appears to be a 2″ thick concrete wall.The toggle bolts had no room to expand and wouldn’t open.There is a gap(there’s a breeze) what would work best?

  14. chuck Wood Says:
    May 14th, 2011 at 10:55 am

    I have old vinyl paneling over 3/8 drywall some of the paneling joints are loose & no studs behind to anchor.I want to anchor & patch so I can paint. Any ideas on fastening Vinyl Paneling to dry wall where needed would be greatly appreciated.CW

  15. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    May 18th, 2011 at 10:12 am

    Hi Brunnhilde,
    If the weight from the bike will be down, either plastic or lead anchors should hold it. You could also use concrete screws.
    Good luck with your project!

  16. Bobbi Says:
    August 8th, 2011 at 10:55 am

    how do I hang plants (in a hanging basket) on steel siding? I have fond hooks for vinyl siding but not sure if they will work on steel… thanks

  17. Tom Says:
    December 12th, 2011 at 3:25 am

    I am going to hang a kitchen cabinet on a 1 inch solid wooden wall so I can put the bolts anywhere through the back of the 3/8 inch thick medium density fiberboard cabinet. I have six bolts with tee nuts for the job. The cabinets are 2 foot wide by 56 inches long.

    What is their optimal arrangement and spacing from the edge of the cabinet for maximum strength?

  18. Austin Barnes Says:
    January 12th, 2012 at 9:26 am

    I have an 18″h x 18″w x 2″ thick cast cement piece that I would like to hang on my plaster walls. I am thinking a french cleat may be the way to go, but how do I fasten to the back of the smooth cement panel and to the plaster wall?

    Also, an unrelated question:
    I always pre-drill before nailing picture hangers in my plaster wall, but I got lazy and skipped it yesterday. As I was nailing I could hear stuff falling inside of the wall. No damage to the outside of the wall, but did I do any damage on the inside? Or was it just excess plaster bits falling off?

    Thanks!!!

  19. N Says:
    January 13th, 2012 at 7:08 pm

    Don’t forget picture hooks and wire from crown molding! No holes in anything, and you can easily adjust location and position of pictures!

  20. Kymberly Says:
    January 28th, 2012 at 9:58 pm

    We just purchased a 1949 Cinder Block home in South Lake Tahoe, CA. We are working in the Kitchen now. It’s gutted and the walls are not even – we want to make the walls even so that we can hang Kitchen cabinets – Do you have any suggestion? Do we hang plywood up first & if so, How?
    Thanks for your help!

  21. Lee Says:
    February 21st, 2012 at 2:59 pm

    Don’t know if you’re still addressing questions on this thread …
    What would you recommend for hanging a small object (less than a pound) from a plaster ceiling? I bought screw in hooks rated up to 12lbs (per the package), but am still a little worried that the item could just fall out of the ceiling. (It’s a decorative item over a changing table.)

    Thanks in advance!

  22. Diane Says:
    February 25th, 2012 at 5:40 pm

    I want to install a double pivoting arm towel bar on the back of a hollow core door. What is the best way to make sure it can safely hold a couple of large towels and not pull out or ruin the door? One person suggested this but I felt the instructions were clear at all, i.e. what is a non-expanding base etc. He said…If you need to repair or improve OR just want to do the job as well as it can possibly be done then:
    A) Drill holes (or use the screw holes you previously made)

    B) Squeeze in a non-expanding base into the hollow core door
    (between the sheets of veneer there is normally a diamond shaped open grid made of cardboard that will act as a barrier to hold your diamond shaped fixing block in place.

    C) Wait for your fixing blocks to dry solid

    D) Screw your screws into the fixing blocks you have made inside the door

    I would love more clear, detailed instructions:) Thank you!

  23. donna Says:
    March 17th, 2012 at 1:07 am

    How can we hang flourescent strip lights from a concrete warehouse ceiling? The ceiling is a series of 12″ drop flutes with flat areas between

  24. Dave Says:
    May 14th, 2012 at 3:27 pm

    How can I hang a 15-20 lbs light from a hook in a plaster and lath ceiling? There are no joists anywhere in the area where I want to hang the light. Is it possible to use a molly bolt in the ceiling with that kind of weight?

  25. Kara Says:
    May 15th, 2012 at 12:54 am

    I recently got a new aluminum patio roof/overhang and I want to know how to hang my windchimes, decorative lights etc. I’ve heard that aluminum doesn’t “get along” with alot of other metals….I don’t want the roof or fasteners to oxidize or rust….

  26. Charlie Says:
    May 15th, 2012 at 12:02 pm

    I need to fasten the bottom steel sleeves for a ladder rack onto a pickup trucks bed. the problem is there is a bed liner and trim that prevents them from being bolted into the frame. The bed liner prevents access to install and tighten the nuts. Is there a molly that can be installed into the metal bed frame that would be strong enough to support the ladder racks with additional weight?

  27. Paul Says:
    May 22nd, 2012 at 2:34 pm

    Hi,

    I just moved into an apartment and want to cover one wall with chalkboard paint. I have to leave the walls in the original condition so I thought of painting sheets of 1/8″ hardboard or masonite and hanging them from the wall. Is there any way to hang these without damaging the wall? I was thinking of using command strips…I would probably need a lot though in order to support the weight of each panel. I’d appreciate any suggestions for converting the full wall into a chalkboard. Thanks!

  28. Melissa Says:
    May 23rd, 2012 at 7:13 am

    Hi,

    I have a metal back porch and I want to hang some hanging baskets with flowers but I don’t want to drill holes. Is there any type of hook that is made from a strong magnet?

  29. Robert Says:
    May 26th, 2012 at 4:01 pm

    i have one for you, i have a 36″ tube light, my question is how do i attatch that to the side of a glass aquarium?

  30. Christine Says:
    May 30th, 2012 at 12:16 am

    Hello,
    I am trying to figure out how to put led strip lights around my pool because it will be submerged in water.

    Thank you

  31. Sandra S Reeves Says:
    May 30th, 2012 at 7:19 pm

    How can I hang three 3-lb to 5-lb wooden fish on my screened porch that has walls of vinyl siding?

  32. RWalton Says:
    June 3rd, 2012 at 3:00 pm

    I have a 10 ft long x 6 ft hi folding Asian-type paper screen (6 panels), w/a 3/4-inch metal frame on all sides. There are 6 metal loops(located on the back of the top metal frame, at end of each panel=6 metal loops). It’s not extremely heavy b/c it’s paper. It was originally hung by small picture hooks. We took it down and now can’t get it back on the hooks without one or another panel unhooking.
    My contractor has tried multiple times. He’s now suggesting nailing it to the wall through the frame–there must be a better way. Any suggestions welcome.
    Thank you.

  33. Lisa Says:
    June 13th, 2012 at 6:25 pm

    I have an alumawood patio and was trying to hang lights. Stickies wouldn’t work and I tried to use a nail and it wouldn’t penetrate. What could I use?

  34. john prado Says:
    September 11th, 2012 at 3:50 pm

    Hi Dan how do i secure blinds weighing about40-50 lbs. onto alumawood patio cover,since wall is so thin, and living in a high wind area? thanks

  35. Kristen Says:
    September 22nd, 2012 at 4:11 pm

    Hi Danny,
    I want to hang plants from my ceiling that has wood paneling. Is an all purpose hook (hook with a screw) enough or do u recommend something else? Thanks!

  36. Linda Says:
    September 24th, 2012 at 1:12 pm

    Having trouble reupholstering oak chairs. Wood keeps splitting. Someone told be to use “toggle” nails but I have searched and cannot find. Any suggestions?

  37. Cindy Says:
    October 16th, 2012 at 3:53 pm

    Please give instructions on how to install a hanging swag lamp (approx. 3 lbs.) from a plaster ceiling. Thanks!

  38. alan Says:
    January 13th, 2013 at 11:28 am

    what can I use to fix a light to a plastic bathroom ceiling as screws keep coming loose,have tried putting a bit of glue on screw to no avail. thanks

  39. Eve Holmes Says:
    February 6th, 2013 at 8:46 pm

    I am helping my disabled sister with some things at her mobile home. I am the creative/handyman of the two sisters. I purchased a lovely Tiffany Swag lamp and while I made a hole in the ceiling it felt like cardboard. Of course I used the Toggle bolt it came with and the lamp is only 8 pounds. But living in Southern California and it’s winds and earthquakes..wondering if this lovely lamp will stay put? Thank you.

  40. Lin Says:
    March 25th, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    I am trying to hang a long bookshelf and have true using shallow anchors in the drywall but they keeping ripping out. I then went and got toggle lock anchors only to find out that after about an inch and a half there is concrete behind the wall. What should I use for this project?

  41. Christine Says:
    March 31st, 2013 at 6:55 pm

    How do you measure where the nails will go into the wall when hanging a decorative [i.e. plaster] wall plaque that has two holes in back of it? Thank you.

  42. Preston Says:
    April 21st, 2013 at 5:23 am

    I have aluminum ceiling on my patio, I am wanting to hang a light which weighs 55 lbs can this be done with a toggle bolt?

  43. Maggie Says:
    April 23rd, 2013 at 11:31 am

    Judging by the comments, seems I’m not the only one that clicked on this link expecting to finally learn how to screw brackets into aluminum porch beams, only to find that it is not covered in the article.

    Let me know when this is covered on the show or online and I’ll tune in. I’ve got the “notify me to followup comments” box checked to make it easy for you.

  44. Jay Says:
    April 27th, 2013 at 12:50 pm

    I want to put my 32″ TV on the wall using a TV mount. My problem is I have paneling and no sheetrock behind it. The place I need to put it,is not close to a stud. What can I do?

  45. Tad Says:
    June 23rd, 2013 at 3:00 pm

    I’m hanging a 32lb mirror on a wood paneled wall with no sheetrock underneath. The mirror came with D rings attached. What would be the best type of hanger? I’m told the paneling is tongue & groove and approximately 1/2″ thick.

  46. Terrie Says:
    July 19th, 2013 at 5:35 pm

    Hi,
    I have an faux wood aluminum patio cover and would like to hang plants and wind chimes. Should I drill holes in the patio cover or will that ruin it?
    Thanks so much for your help!!!
    Terrie

  47. Nora Chestnut Says:
    August 13th, 2013 at 1:20 pm

    What material is used to hang decor on plastic shed wall.

  48. Wendy From UK Says:
    September 1st, 2013 at 6:03 am

    Please can some one help – I have 4″ dense external insulation and it is finished with silicone render. I want to hang a slate door number plate (about 8lbs) to the insulation, but don’t know the best way to do it. Also if I drill into the brick behind – how do a get the 1″ plug to go in properly as I usually have to hammer them home.

    This is a ’1′ chance to do it right as I dont want to ruin the finish?

  49. Marta Says:
    November 10th, 2013 at 8:41 pm

    I moved into a town home with a vaulted ceiling room with a mirrored wall. I would like to attach shelf strips to the mirror so that I could have floor to ceiling glass shelves with a mirror back. I have called glass installers and am told that they will not drill into the mirror because it might crack. Is there an adhesive that will hold shelving strips so that I can attach moveable brackets? I know that there are some amazing glues available. I own the home so there is no landlord to worry about. Thanks for any ideas!

  50. Samson Ledua Says:
    November 14th, 2013 at 1:57 am

    I am trying to mount a Netball Rim on my front porch and just wondering what’s the best possible way to attach it . I first attach it on the facial board using the molly bolt but the rim kept coming off after sometimes when we use it. What is the best fastener to really secure it so that the rim doesn’t keep falling out of place?

  51. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    November 18th, 2013 at 9:24 am

    Hi Marta,
    If the fascia board is wood, you should be able to screw it directly to it.

    Thank you for your interest!

  52. Marcel Says:
    November 21st, 2013 at 4:25 pm

    I have an unfinished basement that has been petitioned off with metal studs and cement board rather than drywall. Drywall doesn’t fare well in damp conditions. How do I hang lightweight items on cement board?

  53. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    December 16th, 2013 at 11:42 am

    Hi Marcel,
    If the cement board has been painted, you can use selfadhesive fasteners, such as 3M Command Strips, for hanging lightweight items. Other options include drilling a hole and using plastic anchors and a screw, or molly bolts.

  54. Cindy Hampton Says:
    January 23rd, 2014 at 9:08 pm

    I would like to hang a clamp style rack (like a pincher) on the inside of a hollow door to hang mops, brooms etc what kind of bolt, or is their a glue that would support the weight?

  55. charlotte leblanc Says:
    February 28th, 2014 at 8:00 am

    I want to hang a large mirror on the door going to the garage. It is a steel door the mirror will be 21″ x 60″. I would prefer not to glue it to the door. Any suggetions? There will be a frame surrounding the mirror.
    Thanks you so much.
    Charlotte

  56. Launa Gomez Says:
    March 22nd, 2014 at 6:41 pm

    How can I hang a 30 pound chandelier between two tree about twelve feet apart. I wanted to use something like clear fishing line, but I do not know how to attach it to the trees. I think it could look like it was floating in air. Please advise me and share your thoughts.
    Thank you for your time and consideration.
    Launa

  57. Joyce Fereira Says:
    April 3rd, 2014 at 9:49 pm

    Can we install a wall bed over wood paneling without jeopardizing the strength of the wall bed?

  58. Michelle Says:
    April 8th, 2014 at 11:07 am

    I want to hang a metal hook on particle board. I can not use a nail or screw as the particle board is too thin. I’m looking for an adhesive tape or spray. The hook is straightforward approx. 4″ and weighs less than an ounce. Any recommendations?
    Thank you.

  59. donna blanshan Says:
    April 23rd, 2014 at 3:55 pm

    I have pool caged in. Trying to find some way to hang wind chimes. Do not want to make holes in cage.

  60. Opal Says:
    May 16th, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    I have a Aluminum Patio and would like to hang led patio lights around it. I don’t know how to do it and what brackets to use. Could you please help me. On 3 walls I have a aluminum gutter. The other wall just the back of the garage. Your help would be appreciated. Thank you

  61. Michael Says:
    June 16th, 2014 at 3:28 pm

    I have a rather heavy mirror, with two attachment points to hang over a rock fire place. The rock is the pre-fab kind that is cemented onto the drywall. What is the best way to hang it ensuring that the rock does not shift or come loose. The rock is approximately 3-3.5″ thick. I’m concerned that the weight of the mirror may cause the rock to come loose.

  62. Laura Turner Says:
    June 19th, 2014 at 5:48 am

    I am wanting to attach a shelf to the interior of a wooden summer house. The paneling is very thin (around 2cm) and there is only one middle joist (around 2 inch wide) with which to attach to/from. Any suggestions on what kind of fittings I could use? I don’t want to pull the building down.
    Thank you

  63. keven952 Says:
    July 6th, 2014 at 11:42 am

    So happy I came across this!

  64. Laurie Says:
    July 8th, 2014 at 10:30 pm

    I have a heavy mirror that I want to attach to a concave wall. Any suggestions on how to do this?

  65. Priya Says:
    August 11th, 2014 at 1:16 am

    Hello,

    I need a little help as I need to decorate a wall while at the same time hide a quite horrible door, I’m thinking of hanging a sheet and attach some flowers(maybe small bouquets). I don’t know how much that gonna weigh but am sure you can help me out. I need to know which type of hanger can I use? Please help as I need it for next Saturday(16.08.14) for an engagement. It will be great if no drilling is required, as I don’t have that much facility.
    Thanks
    Regards,
    Priya

  66. cihelen2001 Says:
    September 2nd, 2014 at 9:45 am

    I had a new pantry door installed, it’s hollow over the entire door. I purchased wired shelving and had someone try to hang it. Holes were made and those plastic molly’s were place in the holes, but still the screws would not take hold for those plastic strips to hand the baskets. Any other way to hand this?

  67. Andrea Says:
    September 7th, 2014 at 5:23 pm

    I want to attach a heavy framed picture to a thin mdf display board to place on an easel at a trade show. What would I use to attach the picture to the board please?

  68. Deb Says:
    September 14th, 2014 at 8:59 pm

    I have wire shelves hanging above my sewing/craft table. The problem is I didn’t realize how much light I would lose until everything was up & put away. I was so excited to start on my daughter’s wedding accessories but that quickly deminished when the little work lamps didn’t put out enough light. I want florescent lighting under the wall-hung wire shelves. There is power, wee used rubbermaid’s fast trac & the vertical tracks attached to studs. Help me find a was to brighten up my own little anti-chaos corner of my house!

  69. Mike Nasser Says:
    October 17th, 2014 at 5:39 pm

    I hung a 25 lb framed mirror (about 40″ long by 30″ wide) in drywall using two plastic anchors that came with a wire shelf Back Wall Clip. The plastic anchor is designed for masonry / concrete but seems to be holding very well in the drywall. I couldn’t use the Molly bolt or plastic butterfly type of anchor because the stud is in the way. It’s a METAL stud so the molly bolt would not go through it! This forced me to use a shorter plastic anchor described above. Do you think this is good enough? Currently the mirror looks fine but I’m concerned it might fall later if the anchor is not strong for this weight. Thanks!

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