Home Improvement Expert Danny Lipford

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How to Seal and Paint a Garage Floor


If your garage floor has seen better days, you might want to consider sealing and painting it. Watch this video to find out how to give your garage floor a new look with a two-part epoxy paint kit. ...More




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How to Seal and Paint a Garage Floor

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Sealing a Garage Floor

If your garage floor has seen better days, you might consider sealing it. While there are many products available, we used a two-part epoxy kit from Rust-Oleum. The kit contains everything you need to have your garage floor looking like new including cleaner, two-part epoxy coating, decorative paint chips, and even an instructional DVD.

The epoxy coating won’t bond well if the floor has already been sealed, so test it first by pouring a little water on the floor. If the water beads up, the floor has been sealed before.

You also should check for excess moisture in the slab by taping a 2’ by 2’ piece of plastic to the floor for 24 hours. If the area under the plastic appears damp, then the epoxy might have problems adhering. Newly poured concrete should cure at least a month before sealing.

To apply an epoxy coating to a garage floor:

  1. Remove all items from the garage.
  2. Sweep or blow out all dirt and debris.
  3. Remove any oil or grease stains with mineral spirits and a scrub brush.
  4. Wipe up the mineral spirits and residue with paper towels.
  5. Mix the cleaner with water and apply with a long-handled scrub brush.
  6. Hose off the cleaner and allow the floor to dry thoroughly.
  7. Fill any cracks in the slab with concrete repair caulk and allow to dry.
  8. Mix the two-part epoxy sealer together and stir thoroughly.
  9. Trim out the edges with a brush then roll the floor within the time specified.
  10. Allow the floor to cure according to the instructions before putting into use.

Not only will sealing the floor improve the look of your garage, the smooth surface will be much easier to sweep and keep clean.

Further Information



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25 Comments on “How to Seal and Paint a Garage Floor”

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  1. Deb T Says:
    October 3rd, 2007 at 12:12 pm

    does the epoxy paints stand up to hydrostatic pressure?

  2. Deb T Says:
    October 3rd, 2007 at 12:21 pm

    sorry I just read the entire blog again and realized you answered that with the plastic test. Does Durolock (sp) waterproofing help in a situation like this. It claims that if used to thier specifications you can use acrylic floor paint on top and it will stick regardless of hydrostatic pressure..any comments? I am just now trying to get carpet glue off the concrete flooring after a flood in our lower level..the idiots that installed it used carpet tacks AND then used an enormous amount of adhesive for some reason. Jasco is taking it off but ive decided to rent a diamond grinder with three heads and an attached wet vac and hopefuly will do the eight hundred sf i need to do in a weekend..all five feet two inches of me. ( no woman tells thier weight)

  3. Crystal Clear Fun » Sealing the Garage Floor Says:
    October 5th, 2007 at 2:39 pm

    [...] Handy man extraordinaire Danny Lipford published an article on sealing a garage floor. It’s a must-read for garage owners. [...]

  4. greg Says:
    October 9th, 2007 at 12:19 pm

    WHAT IS THE BEST PRODUCT TO USE ON MY GARAGE FLOOR TO LEVEL IT OUT CORRECTLY BY THE DOOR. THE PROBLEM I HAVE IS WHEN IT SNOWS IT MELTS AND SETTLES IN MY LOW SPOTTS. WHAT IS THE BEST PRODUCT AT HOME DEPOT TO LEVEL IT OUT? THANKS

  5. Deb T Says:
    November 6th, 2007 at 1:10 am

    Greg Is the problem the floor or a drainage issue? The solution I would suggest would be to dig drains at the entrance to your garage, covered by grates so that when you drove over them, you would be able to do so with ease and then direct the drainage into a sump pump. The only way to level the floor at this point is to resurface it I believe with an expensive overlayment which is attractive but about twenty dollars a sf depending upon the area you live in. If the water isn’t too much of an issue maybe putting a better seal on the bottom of the garage door would help. I know we did that and it helped a great deal. It is so tight the water delivery people think it’s locked when they deliver water for our drinking fountain. But it does help to some degree.

  6. Patty Says:
    November 25th, 2007 at 9:52 pm

    I have my garage issue. I do have hyrdrostatic pressure and it may have been caused by a bad wax ring in nearby bathroom. It has caused our flooring to buckle (wood flooring),existing to when we bought the house, now I want to paint or seal the garage flooring. Every time i go in there barefoot my feet are white and drag into the house. Do I need a contractor to further look into more problems. My husband has placed draing rocks to the side of the house due to swamp cooler. Too many wet problems here.
    Help my sobbiness.

  7. randy price Says:
    December 9th, 2007 at 11:12 pm

    I believe I have water coming up from under my garage floor, although it is peculiar. It can pour down rain and the floor is dry, humidity and it gets wet. When I leave a box or anything on the floor and move it after a couple of days the spot is damp. Any suggestions?

  8. paulb Says:
    January 8th, 2008 at 1:59 am

    I’ve seen homeowners in warmer climates simply lay out a end roll piece of vinyl flooring that they’ve acquired as a remnant. One can get years of use before replacing and no real labor issues. Nothing better for clean-up issues, wet or dry.

  9. Alex Says:
    February 17th, 2008 at 1:34 pm

    My garage floor shows a crack in it. It appears to come from the outside wall about half way in the garage. Also, lots of water comes off the trucks wheels from melted snow or just rain water. What is the best thing to do in this case?

  10. Nick Says:
    October 24th, 2008 at 9:01 am

    I recently purchased a new home and the garage floor has never been sealed. The problem is, is that it’s October and it’s about 40 degrees outside. Is this to cold to seal a garage floor? I live in Ohio and the winters here are usually pretty bad and alot of melted snow and road salt. I wanted to park my car in the garage this winter, so hopefully I can seal a floor in cold weather. I’m not painting the floor, I just want to put a coat of standard sealer down. Please let me know what I need to do, and if it’s a bad idea to park my car in the garage without sealing the floor first.

  11. larry barthe Says:
    November 21st, 2008 at 1:10 pm

    I would like to know the answer to Nick’s question. I am in Minnesota. I close on my house 12-5-08 and I would like to seal the garage floor before the first snow and salt gets on it. What do I do??

  12. dan sojourner Says:
    January 12th, 2009 at 10:58 am

    I purchased a split level home two years ago. The garage floor, although level, has cracks in floor, and is allowing water sepage to occur, resulting in large puddles of water on the garage floor. What is the best plan of attack? To have the floor sealed, or do I need more drastic measures?

  13. Don Phillips Says:
    January 14th, 2009 at 2:51 pm

    We recently purchased a house, but by the garage door, the concrete is pitted and snow blows in. Some of the pits are up to an inch deep. Once it warms up I would like to fix the concrete and seal it so we don’t have problems again next year. Would a concrete patch work or will the sealer adhere to it?

  14. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    January 15th, 2009 at 8:39 am

    Don,
    You might want to consider using a concrete resurfacer, like Danny did in the video How to Repair Cracks in Concrete.

  15. Dave G Says:
    February 6th, 2009 at 12:11 pm

    I did my garage and basement myself last year. I took some pretty extensive photos of the entire process, which folks may find useful here: http://www.goodrum.cx/fall2007projects The epoxy flooring project is about halfway down the page.

  16. Mario Says:
    April 26th, 2010 at 7:38 am

    What if the garage floor was already sealed?
    Do you have to remove the old seal? If so, how?

  17. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    April 27th, 2010 at 1:00 pm

    Hi Mario,
    If your garage floor has concrete sealer on it (i.e. water beads up), two-part epoxy products may not adhere properly and shouldn’t be applied. If the floor has been painted, epoxy products can be applied if the old paint is adhering well to the concrete and has been scruff sanded first. To test whether old paint is adhering well, cut an “X” through the old coating, press a piece of duct tape firmly down over the cut, pull the tape off in a quick motion. Don’t apply epoxy finish over it if more than a quarter of the paint comes off on the tape. Good luck with your project!

  18. gary douglas Says:
    May 26th, 2010 at 2:00 pm

    I cannot get to all the sides without moving some heavy equipment. If I do most of the floor but leave one side without sealer will the rest of the floor stay pretty dry or will there be a lot of sweating from the unprotected area, etc. Said another way, does the floor stay dry where I seal it even if spot treated? Thanks. Gary

  19. Garet Says:
    July 27th, 2010 at 11:59 pm

    I’m wanting to apoxy my garage floor and have a smoot finsh but I need to know if the expantion joints need to be filled first and if so what ia the best thing to use.

  20. PHIL PRICE Says:
    August 3rd, 2010 at 7:04 am

    WHAT CAN I USE ON A GARAGE FLOOR THAT HAS BEEN SEALED TO GIVE IT A COLOR FINISH.THIS IS A 5 YR OLD HOME. I HEARD EPOXY SHOULD NOT BE USED

  21. Kyle Says:
    September 17th, 2010 at 3:09 pm

    The previous owner had painted the garage floor with a white paint, it looks like crap now. Do i need to get ALL the paint off before i can seal it?

  22. Ann Says:
    December 13th, 2010 at 8:00 am

    We just purchased a brand new home in Pennsylvania and wanted to know the same thing as Nick and Larry above- Can I seal my garage floor in cold temperatures? Thanks!

  23. Official Comment:

    Ben Erickson Says:
    December 14th, 2010 at 10:27 am

    Hi Ann,
    That will depend on the particular product you use, so check the label or contact the manufacturer to find out. According to Rust-Oleum, the epoxy product featured in this video should not be applied when the air is under 60° F or the concrete floor is below 55° F.

  24. Matt Says:
    January 2nd, 2012 at 11:15 am

    I recently purchased a home and water in my garage (from snow melting) is draining towards my house foundation. I recently discovered that moisture is getting through the concrete block foundation and affecting the drywall (little moisture spots are visibly apparent).

    Do you know if sealing my garage floor would prevent water from seeping down along the foundation? i.e. would the sealant be strong enough to not let any water penetrate?

    Also, I live in MN and am eager to hear if you have an answer to the temperature question.

    Thanks!

  25. karen Says:
    August 21st, 2012 at 11:06 am

    what about the wood around the floor? what can I seal that with?

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