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Carbon Monoxide Safety

By: Danny Lipford

Carbon monoxide has been called the “invisible” killer. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every year more than 100 people die from unintentional exposure to carbon monoxide produced from using a charcoal grill, exhaust from an automobile, portable generators and various gas appliances.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are very similar to the flu, but without the fever. They include headache, shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea and dizziness. If you suspect that you are experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning, then get fresh air immediately. Contact your local fire department from a neighbor’s home and let them determine if it’s safe to return home.

In order to protect your family, install a carbon monoxide detector inside your home and be sure to have appliances and heating systems checked regularly.


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  • Official Comment:


    Thomas Boni Says:
    July 26th, 2019 at 12:59 pm

    Hi, Donna,
    It’s fine to install the carbon monoxide detector on a ceiling, according to the National Fire Protection Association.
    However, you don’t need to install one near a floor.
    Here’s more information about that: https://support.google.com/googlenest/answer/9259392?hl=en
    Thanks for your question!



  • Donna Huber Says:
    July 26th, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    I have a combination smoke and carbon monoxide detector placed on the ceiling in a hallway between two bedrooms. I have just heard that you should not place it on the ceiling. Is this true?


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Carbon Monoxide Safety